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More than 900 million international journeys are undertaken every year (WHO, 2012). Global travel on this scale exposes many people to a range of health risks. Many of these risks, can be minimized by precautions taken before travel. Which travel vaccinations do you need, and where to get them?

LATEST NEWS & UPDATES

Yellow fever

Date: June 15, 2012

The 17D vaccine, which is based on a live, attenuated viral strain, is the only commercially available yellow fever vaccine. It is given as a…

more

Hepatitis A

Date: June 15, 2012

Hepatitis A vaccination should be considered for individuals aged ≥1 year who are travelling to countries or areas with moderate to high risk of infection.…

more

Vaccination – the best Travel Insurance you’ll ever buy

Date: June 15, 2012

Overseas travelers have up to a 50% chance of suffering travel-related illness. Illnesses may be caused by contaminated food or water, poor personal hygiene or…

more

Vaccinations for all travellers

Date: June 15, 2012

Many of the world’s National Health and Medical Councils recommend certain vaccinations as routine for all travellers. These include: Tetanus Diphtheria Pertussis (whooping cough) Measles…

more

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Yellow fever

Date: June 15, 2012

The 17D vaccine, which is based on a live, attenuated viral strain, is the only commercially available yellow fever vaccine. It is given as a single subcutaneous (or intramuscular) injection. Yellow fever vaccine is highly effective (approaching 100%). All individuals aged 9 months or older and living in countries or areas at risk should receive yellow fever vaccine*.

Many tropical countries in Africa and South America will not accept travellers from an area where there is yellow fever, unless they can prove that they have been vaccinated against it.

(*source: World Health Organization, WHO)

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Hepatitis A

Date: June 15, 2012

Hepatitis A vaccination should be considered for individuals aged ≥1 year who are travelling to countries or areas with moderate to high risk of infection. Those at high risk of acquiring the disease should be strongly encouraged to be vaccinated regardless of where they travel.

Two types of HAV vaccines are currently available internationally:

1) Formaldehyde-inactivated hepatitis A virus vaccines. Inactivated HAV vaccines are used in most countries. Monovalent inactivated HAV vaccines are available in paediatric dose (0.5 ml) for children aged >1 year to 15 years, and in adult dose (1 ml).

2) Live attenuated vaccines (based on H2 and LA-1 HAV strains). These vaccines are manufactured and used mainly in China and sporadically in the private sector in India.

Inactivated hepatitis A vaccines are safe and highly effective. Two doses are necessary to promote long-term protection. Results from mathematical models indicate that, after completion of the primary two-dose series, anti-HAV antibodies may persist for 25 years or more. Serological testing to assess antibody levels after vaccination is not indicated.

(source: World Health Organization, WHO)

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Vaccination – the best Travel Insurance you’ll ever buy

Date: June 15, 2012

Overseas travelers have up to a 50% chance of suffering travel-related illness. Illnesses may be caused by contaminated food or water, poor personal hygiene or infected insects. Therefore, prior to travel it is good idea to have a medical checkup for personalized advice on how to reduce your risk of illness.

If you are only travelling to countries in northern and central Europe or North America, it is unlikely that you will need to have any vaccinations. If you are travelling outside these countries, it is likely that some vaccinations will be required.

If possible, see your GP at least eight weeks before you are due to travel, because some vaccinations need to be given well in advance.

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Vaccinations for all travellers

Date: June 15, 2012

Many of the world’s National Health and Medical Councils recommend certain vaccinations as routine for all travellers. These include:

The common diseases of childhood occur more frequently in developing countries, but they can also occur in adults in Western countries.

Consult your local Health & Medical Council before departing on an international journey.

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